Skip to content
Wild Things / Far and Near: Photographs by Rob Sabatini

Wild Things / Far and Near: Photographs by Rob Sabatini

Rob Sabatini applies the same pursuit of knowledge, attention to detail and excellence in technique to his profession of periodontics as he does to his avocation—wildlife photography. A boyhood love of the outdoors and an early interest in amateur photography have grown into a passion of adulthood. In 2009, he learned of a rookery of great blue herons on the James River in downtown Richmond. He hit the river with his first camera and an old 100-300mm lens and discovered a creative outlet that has taken him into the plains of East Africa, the river banks of the Amazon Basin, to U.S. national parks and his own backyard in search of images of glorious wildlife. The images in this exhibit were chosen to highlight some of Rob’s favorites over the past three years, with selections that highlight subjects from both travel expeditions and more local venues. The 2015 exhibition at Tompkins-McCaw is his first.

Real Life Film Series

Real Life Film Series

Students, faculty, staff and health professionals are invited to take a break to enjoy engaging documentaries on health science topics followed by discussion about how the film relates to current work at VCU and impacts global health. Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences selects documentary films relevant to current events for a lunchtime showing. New for this year's film series, guests with expertise in the topic will join in for lively discussions about the science and content explored in the film. Fun and informative, the Real Life series connects you to ideas and others in the VCU medical academic community. Bring your lunch.

Meet VCU's Authors: David C. Wojahn

Meet VCU's Authors: David C. Wojahn

David C. Wojahn, professor of English, talks about his new book, From the Valley of Making: Essays on the Craft of Poetry (University of Michigan Press, 2015). The book seeks to examine the state of American verse as it enters the first decades of a new millennium, focusing on both the challenges and opportunities of an ancient art as it tries to adapt to the cultural, technological and political transformations of our turbulent era. Each of the essays in this book makes an impassioned and nuanced argument against the so-called marginalization of poetry in contemporary American culture.

9th Annual Oehler Lecture: "Five Miles Away, a World Apart: Five Years Later"

9th Annual Oehler Lecture: "Five Miles Away, a World Apart: Five Years Later"

James Ryan, dean of the Harvard School of Graduate Education, presents "Five Miles Away, a World Apart: Five Years Later." A leading expert on law and education, Ryan will revisit his Richmond-based book, Five Miles Away, a World Apart, as a means of discussing the current state of education. Ryan has written extensively about the ways in which law structures educational opportunity. His articles and essays address such topics as school desegregation, school finance, school choice, standards and testing, pre-K and the intersection of special education and neuroscience.

Meet VCU's Authors: Faedah Totah

Meet VCU's Authors: Faedah Totah

Faedah Totah, associate professor of political science, talks about her new book, Preserving the Old City of Damascus (Syracuse University Press, 2014). One of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world and a major cultural and religious center, Damascus is a repository of numerous civilizations, ancient and modern, that embody the collective national, as well as Arab/Islamic, memory. Although a protected UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1979, the Old City attracted the interest of investors only toward the end of the last century.

Levis Reading Prize Night

Levis Reading Prize Night

Sandra Lim, winner of the 2015 Levis Reading Prize for The Wilderness, reads from her book and then participates in a question-and-answer session with the audience. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event will be followed by a book sale and signing.

Edith Cavell: "A Nurse Who Did Her Duty"

Edith Cavell: "A Nurse Who Did Her Duty"

Edith Cavell (Dec. 4, 1865–Oct. 12, 1915), after training and working as a nurse in her native England, was recruited as matron of a medical school in Brussels, Belgium. In the early days of WWI, she began to shelter British soldiers from the German occupation and to help them flee to the neutral Netherlands. In Aug. of 1915, she was arrested and, in Oct. of the same year, was put to death. Her execution caused an international uproar and media frenzy, and she quickly became an icon of the war effort and the nursing profession. In recognition of the 100th anniversary of Nurse Cavell's martyrdom, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences proudly presents an exhibit of postcards pertaining to Nurse Cavell from the collection of Kay Seidenberg, a long-time Friends of VCU Libraries donor, as well as a graduate of the VCU School of Nursing.

How-to Talks by Postdocs

How-to Talks by Postdocs

How-to Talks by Postdocs is a series of instructional brown-bag lunch talks for the general VCU health-sciences community taught by postdocs. These are not seminar talks, but an opportunity for postdocs to share how to do something related to the health sciences. Talks are held on Mondays from noon–1 p.m. at Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences (MCV Campus), first-floor conference room. All in the VCU community are welcome to attend and are encouraged to bring their own lunches. Registration is requested.

Advance Your Research

Advance Your Research

A day of drop-in workshops for graduate students and advanced researchers, designed to help make your research process better, faster and smarter. Topics include research poster design, science/arts collaboration, authors' rights, networking and research tips and tricks.

International Open Access Week 2015

International Open Access Week 2015

In conjunction with the international Open Access Week initiative, VCU Libraries presents several exciting open-access events that will be of interest to faculty, early career researchers, graduate and undergraduate students.

Unmasked: A Visual Dissection

Unmasked: A Visual Dissection

Nickolai Walko, a graduate of the VCU School of the Arts, has developed a unique and eye-catching form of image-making that hybridizes classical drawing and pop art. After placing a layer of black masking tape on a brightly colored panel or wall, covering the surface from edge to edge, he draws elaborate designs, often anatomical, directly on the tape and then, using an X-Acto blade, meticulously cuts out sections of the tape to create a strong-contrast image. Finally, to prevent tape decay, he sprays the work with a polyurethane coating. Given his anatomical subjects, Walko appropriately likens his elaborate process to a medical operation, with the tape serving as skin and the removing of the tape representing the exposed anatomy. At this show at Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, he showcases his anatomical creations, some of which have been inspired by materials from the library collection.

Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Collection

Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Collection

Tompkins-McCaw Library is proud to host the traveling National Library of Medicine exhibit "Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Collection." Drawing from the extensive Zwerdling Collection of postcards housed at the National Library of Medicine, the exhibit explores the hold that images of nursing have exerted on the public imagination over time.

Sanger Series: "Intellectual Property and the Academy: An Overview of Patent, Data and Copy RIGHTS"

Sanger Series: "Intellectual Property and the Academy: An Overview of Patent, Data and Copy RIGHTS"

Why do universities make significant distinctions among ownership of data, inventions and scholarly works? What are researchers and scholars giving away when they sign with publishers? What perils are inherent in consulting NDAs, CDAs and other industry agreements? What work belongs to faculty, and what belongs to students? University writers grapple with such questions on a daily basis, but there seem seldom to be simple, clear answers. Join us as University Counsel Madelyn Wessel navigates the complex and much-contested issue of intellectual property. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. The lecture will begin at noon.

Meet VCU's Authors: Emilie Raymond

Meet VCU's Authors: Emilie Raymond

Emilie Raymond, associate professor of history, talks about her new book, Stars for Freedom: Hollywood, Black Celebrities and the Civil Rights Movement (University of Washington Press, 2015). Americans have come to expect that Hollywood celebrities—from Oprah Winfrey to Angelina Jolie, George Clooney to Leonardo DiCaprio—will be outspoken advocates for social and political causes. However, that wasn't always the case. As Emilie Raymond shows, during the civil-rights movement the Stars for Freedom, a handful of celebrities both black and white, risked their careers by crusading for racial equality and forged the role of celebrity in American political culture.

Copyright for Creators

Copyright for Creators

In the digital age, everyone is a publisher or a maker or a creator. Whether you work in a studio, a classroom, or social media, understanding copyright is a foundational skill. VCU Libraries, in concert with the VCU School of the Arts and arts librarians, introduces a new series for 2015–16 on the nuances of copyright for artists, designers and art scholars.

VCU Cabell First Novelist Award Night

VCU Cabell First Novelist Award Night

Boris Fishman, winner of the 2015 VCU Cabell First Novelist Award for A Replacement Life, reads from his book and is then joined by his agent for a discussion of the evolution of the book from original idea to first draft to published work. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event will be followed by a public reception and book sale and signing.

Transcribathon

Transcribathon

The Folger Shakespeare Library's Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO) project proudly presents a transcribathon here in James Branch Cabell Library. "A transcriba...what?" you may ask. At the transcribathon, people will get together to transcribe and encode handwritten Early Modern documents. Although all of the documents have been scanned and are available in digital form, they have not been previously transcribed, and those who are familiar with handwriting from the period know that deciphering such documents is not always easy. The purpose of the event is to help the Folger Shakespeare Library make clean transcriptions of its documents so that the documents are more readable and thus more usable for researchers and students around the globe.

Then/Now/Next: The Ku Klux Klan Data Mapping Project, 1915-1940, and Today's Dialogue on Race

Then/Now/Next: The Ku Klux Klan Data Mapping Project, 1915-1940, and Today's Dialogue on Race

VCU Libraries presents an open discussion and presentation about "Mapping the Second Ku Klux Klan, 1915-1940," a digital project between VCU Libraries and VCU Department of History professor John Kneebone, Ph.D. Although the Ku Klux Klan is typically associated with the South—especially states such as Georgia, in which the Klan got its start in 1915—this project, an animated online map, illustrates that the Klan spread with alarming rapidity across the country to establish chapters in all 50 states. The map paints a disturbing portrait of our culture, inviting users to reflect on why the Klan's message of racism, anti-Semitism and anti-Catholicism appealed to so many.

Print+Web 1: Illustration, Typography, Graphic Design

Print+Web 1: Illustration, Typography, Graphic Design

At this latest installment of the Digital Pragmata series, panelists discuss the design and visual aspects of online publishing. What best practices are designers and artists establishing? What tensions exist between good graphic design and good web design? Matt Woolman, associate professor of graphic design and director of creative entrepreneurship at VCUarts, moderates.

Questioning Cinema: Ex Machina

Questioning Cinema: Ex Machina

Explore the science and social impact of robotics, artificial intelligence and human/computer interaction as portrayed in Alex Garland's 2015 science-fiction drama Ex Machina. At the event, attendees will view the film, then investigate and discuss the themes behind it, learning to use library and online resources to question what we've been told.

Meet VCU's Authors: Nicholas Frankel

Meet VCU's Authors: Nicholas Frankel

Nicholas Frankel, Professor of English, will talk about his work on new editions of Oscar Wilde's novels and plays, in particular his recent uncensored edition of Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray (Harvard University Press, 2011).

14th Annual Black History Month Lecture: They Shoot Black People, Don't They?: From Ferguson to NYC, Political Cartoonist Keith Knight on Police Violence in the U.S.

14th Annual Black History Month Lecture: They Shoot Black People, Don't They?: From Ferguson to NYC, Political Cartoonist Keith Knight on Police Violence in the U.S.

For nearly two decades, cartoonist Keith Knight has been creating funny, politically astute comic strips touching upon some of the most divisive issues of our time, including racially motivated police violence. VCU Libraries proudly presents a presentation by Keith Knight that uses comics to take our country to task on the subject of race. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The event will be followed by a book sale and signing and a public reception.

Richmond, VA, and the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Personal Histories of Outreach and Education

Richmond, VA, and the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Personal Histories of Outreach and Education

A panel of activists and community organizers who have been involved over the years in local responses to the HIV/AIDS epidemic will talk about their experiences and Richmond’s history of addressing the many-layered challenges presented by the virus throughout the community.

Meet VCU's Authors: Jason Arnold

Meet VCU's Authors: Jason Arnold

Jason Arnold, Associate Professor of Political Science, will talk about his new book, Secrecy in the Sunshine Era: The Promises and Failures of U.S. Open Government Laws (University Press of Kansas, 2014).

Birth of a Nation, Birth of a Movement: The African American Outcry in Virginia and Nationwide

Birth of a Nation, Birth of a Movement: The African American Outcry in Virginia and Nationwide

2015 marks the 100th anniversary of D.W. Griffith's film The Birth of a Nation. The film is and will continue to be studied and discussed in schools and universities around the world because of its highly paradoxical nature. On the one hand, the film is, according to the American Film Institute, among the top 100 films (number 44) ever made in the United States. On the other hand, the film is also one of the most provocative and controversial films ever made in the United States. It openly defamed African Americans and utilized gross stereotypical portrayals. The film proved to be inflammatory and racially divisive in nature, with violence breaking out in regions of the country where it was shown. During Black History Month, 2016, the VCU Robertson School of Media and Culture and VCU Libraries will explore a different side of this paradox: namely, the reaction to this film by African Americans in Virginia and across the country.

The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore

The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore

Wonder Woman, fighting crime with her super strength and an arsenal of magical weapons, has been an icon of both the comics industry and feminism for generations, but the story of the character's creation by Dr. William Marston is a fascinating case of truth proving to be stranger than fiction. Scholar Jill Lepore delves deep into the seldom-told origins of Wonder Woman and in her book, The Secret History of Woman Woman, shares a tale that is in turns strange, thought provoking and inspiring. The VCU Common Book Program invites you to join us for an evening with Lepore as she discusses this important new addition to pop-cultural and feminist scholarship.

African-American Read-in

African-American Read-in

Celebrate Black History Month in a literary way with the National African American Read-in. Drop in to the lecture hall in Cabell Library anytime between noon and 4 p.m. to hear featured readers from academic departments and student organizations read from works by or about African-Americans, Africans and the diaspora. Featured readings will be scheduled to begin at 1, 2 and 3 p.m., but there will be ample time for unscheduled readers to join in! VCU Libraries will provide a selection of literary works for reading or checking out.

Sanger Series: Improving Transparency and Reproducibility of Scientific Research

Sanger Series: Improving Transparency and Reproducibility of Scientific Research

The currency of science is publishing. Producing novel, positive and clean results maximizes the likelihood of publishing success because those are the best kind of results. There are multiple ways to produce beautiful results: 1) be a genius, 2) be lucky, 3) be patient, or 4) employ flexible analytic and selective reporting practices to manufacture the desired results. In a competitive marketplace with minimal accountability, it is hard to resist 4). The result is a glut of papers that appear beautiful only because they mask their less-than-rigorous methodologies. But there is a way to stop this. Researchers must be rewarded not for their results, but for how they got them. With transparency as their chief objective, researchers won't stop aiming for beautiful papers, but when they gets them, it will be clear that they earned them.

Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature

Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature

Tompkins-McCaw Library is proud to host the traveling National Library of Medicine exhibit "Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature." The exhibit draws from a variety of sources, including materials documenting medical discoveries from the time of Mary Shelley, to explore the scientific backdrop and lasting impact of the famous novel.

New James Branch Cabell Library Grand Opening Celebration

New James Branch Cabell Library Grand Opening Celebration

The construction of the new library building on the Monroe Park Campus is finished at last! Please join us at 5 p.m. in the first-floor atrium of the building for a brief ceremony, followed by guided tours highlighting some of the exciting features of this important addition to the Monroe Park campus.

31st Annual Brown-Lyons Lecture: And the Prophetic Message Lives on...

31st Annual Brown-Lyons Lecture: And the Prophetic Message Lives on...

Dr. Jack D. Spiro's final Brown-Lyons lecture will be devoted to exploring the world of Judaism (and the world itself) through the lens of the Hebrew prophets—the enduring values they espoused, especially the commitment of their lives, in word and deed, to the inseparable bond between justice and compassion. The Hebrew prophets are the supreme teachers of values the Jewish people ever created and among the greatest our world has ever known. What made them so extraordinary? What does their message mean for us today? Let us count the ways as their message lives on...

Advance Your Research Webinar: Getting Started with Systematic Reviews

Advance Your Research Webinar: Getting Started with Systematic Reviews

In conjunction with the popular Advance Your Research series, John Cyrus, research and education librarian at the Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, will offer an introductory workshop on planning and conducting a systematic review. Topics include creating a protocol, the investigator's role and how librarians can help throughout the process.

True Love Forever: Preserving the Legacy of Norman "Sailor Jerry" Collins

True Love Forever: Preserving the Legacy of Norman "Sailor Jerry" Collins

VCU Libraries is proud to host a meeting of the Virginia Conservation Association. At the meeting, Samantha Sheesley, paper conservator at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, will discuss the conservation of the stencils, rubbings and sketches of the iconic WWII-era tattoo artist, Norman "Sailor Jerry" Collins.

Advance Your Research

Advance Your Research

A day of drop-in workshops for graduate students and advanced researchers, designed to help make your research process better, faster and smarter. Topics include interviewing techniques, networking, finding and using scientific images and presentations. We will also visit the new Innovative Media Studio.

Sanger Series: Institutional Conflicts of Interest

Sanger Series: Institutional Conflicts of Interest

This lecture focuses on identification and mitigation of actual or perceived conflicts in research, clinical care, education and university business practices as they impact the university's mission. At the lecture, Lynn Zentner, JD, will distinguish individual conflicts of interest in research from institutional conflicts of interest in research; explain why institutional conflicts of interest matter and how they can, if unaddressed, negatively impact the university's integrity in research, in education and in clinical care; and discuss how an institutional conflicts-of-interest program focusing on research can and must expand its scope in order to comprehensively address all aspects of business practices that impact the university mission.

Meet VCU's Authors: Victor Chen

Meet VCU's Authors: Victor Chen

Victor Chen, Assistant Professor of Sociology, will be talking about his new book, Cut Loose: Jobless and Hopeless in an Unfair Economy (University of California Press, 2015).

VCU Tech Fair 2016

VCU Tech Fair 2016

Technology Services and VCU Libraries present the 2016 VCU Tech Fair on Monday, April 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the VCU Student Commons and on Tuesday, April 5, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences. VCU Tech Fair features information and presentations on the various technology departments and services available to the VCU community. There will be hands-on demos, free light lunch and giveaways, courtesy of vendor contributors.

John Greyson: Fig Trees

John Greyson: Fig Trees

Professor Greyson (Department of Film, York University, Canada) will talk about his documentary film, Fig Trees, which follows South African AIDS activist Zackie Achmat and Canadian AIDS activist Tim McCaskell as they fight for access to treatment for HIV/AIDS. This event, which will include a screening of Fig Trees, is made possible in part by a Quest Global Impact Award.

Neville Hoad: The Fiction of Best Practices—The Novel and the NGO

Neville Hoad: The Fiction of Best Practices—The Novel and the NGO

Professor Hoad (Department of English, University of Texas at Austin) will speak about his current book project, which examines literary and cultural representations of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. This event is made possible in part by a Quest Global Impact Award.

Edwin Cameron: South Africa’s Constitutional Transition and AIDS—A Personal Account

Edwin Cameron: South Africa’s Constitutional Transition and AIDS—A Personal Account

Justice Cameron, who sits on the Constitutional Court of South Africa, will speak about his personal involvement in the struggle to ensure just and humane treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa. This event is made possible in part by a Quest Global Impact Award.

Print+Web 2: Texts, Publishers, Books

Print+Web 2: Texts, Publishers, Books

At this latest installment of the Digital Pragmata series, panelists explore authorship and content in online publishing. How do we represent the best of print in the digital environment? How does digital publishing fit with the traditions and history of publishing? Claire Bourne, assistant professor in the VCU Department of English, moderates. Our panelists will be James Jenkins, publisher at Valancourt Books; Gita Manaktala, editorial director at MIT Press; and Robert Nelson, director of the University of Richmond Digital Scholarship Lab.

THATCamp New Souths 2016

THATCamp New Souths 2016

This unconference at Cabell Library focuses on the intersection and sharing of technology, history, storytelling and hidden voices.

Top

VCU Libraries

James Branch Cabell Library Monroe Park Campus
901 Park Ave., Box 842033
Richmond, VA 23284-2033
Toll-free: (844) 352-7399
(804) 828-1111
All Libraries
Tompkins-McCaw Library MCV Campus
509 N. 12th St., Box 980582
Richmond, VA 23298-0582
Toll-free: (844) 352-7399
(804) 828-0636

Reserve a room

Please choose a library

×